May 9, 2013 AT 3:00 pm

Researchers Use 3D Printer to Craft ‘Invisibility Cloak’ #3dthursday

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From PCMag: Researchers Use 3D Printer to Craft ‘Invisibility Cloak’ … wait, what!?

Researchers at Duke University say they’ve developed a way to use an off-the-shelf 3D printer to produce “invisibility cloaks” they first demonstrated seven years ago.

The cloaking technology developed at Duke’s Pratt School of Engineering doesn’t actually deflect visible light, the university noted. Instead, it involves fashioning a material with different sized holes based on an algorithm which fools microwave beams into not registering the presence of an opaque object placed at the center of the material.

But assistant research professor of electrical and computer engineering Yaroslav Urzhumov and others working on the technology believe someday soon they will be able to deflect higher wavelengths, including visible light. And now Urzhumov and his team have demonstrated that a microwave-deflecting invisibility cloak can be fashioned in just a few hours and on the relative cheap.

“I would argue that essentially anyone who can spend a couple thousand dollars on a non-industry grade 3D printer can literally make a plastic cloak overnight,” Urzhumov was quoted as saying…..

Read more!


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Every Thursday is #3dthursday here at Adafruit! The DIY 3D printing community has passion and dedication for making solid objects from digital models. Recently, we have noticed electronics projects integrated with 3D printed enclosures, brackets, and sculptures, so each Thursday we celebrate and highlight these bold pioneers!

Have you considered building a 3D project around an Arduino or other microcontroller? How about printing a bracket to mount your Raspberry Pi to the back of your HD monitor? And don’t forget the countless LED projects that are possible when you are modeling your projects in 3D!

The Adafruit Learning System has dozens of great tools to get you well on your way to creating incredible works of engineering, interactive art, and design with your 3D printer! If you’ve made a cool project that combines 3D printing and electronics, be sure to let us know, and we’ll feature it here!

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1 Comment

  1. Did you guys notice that KISSlicer(slicing program) has a version for the Raspberry Pi? I use KISSlicer but haven’t
    used the Rpi one(no pi here).

    http://www.kisslicer.com/download.html

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