July 29, 2013 AT 3:41 pm

When Journalism Becomes a Game of Drones

Uavsticker Med-2

When Journalism Becomes a Game of Drones.

In just five years from now, 7,500 licensed unmanned aircrafts — commonly known as drones — will fly the skies above United States soil. By 2030, there will be 30,000.

However, these numbers are conservative. At this very moment, the popular drone hobbyist community DIY Drones boasts 40,000 members. Drones are not the technology of some unknown future. They are a fact of our lives.

That is why, when I received a request to attend a state legislative hearing for a bill to virtually ban all drone flight in the state, the whole thing felt a little ridiculous.

My colleagues and I started the Missouri Drone Journalism Program late last year to figure out if and how journalists could tell compelling stories with these small, unmanned flying vehicles.

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1 Comment

  1. I thought you weren’t allowed to fly above a certain height according to FAA rules.

    I believe drones are less safe than cars because all you have to do is burn out a motor or get dust in one of the motors and dust will destroy the motor. I had a toy helicopter with a gas engine and it flew away and the people who found it wouldn’t give it back so I think if someone sees one of these toys break down and fall out of the sky, you won’t get it back and that will be the end of the toy.

    I believe drones will be banned for a couple of reasons. My residents complained of news helicopters and they also complained about a car dealer that had a balloon on a rope to advertise his business.

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