The new Raspberry Pi B Model B+ is here - Pick one up in the store and check our detailed guide!

July 12, 2013 AT 4:00 am

Pi Video Output Using pygame from the Adafruit Learning System @Raspberry_Pi #piday #raspberrypi

One of the biggest advantages of the Raspberry Pi as a development platform is the easy access you have to a lot of mature, well-designed SW stacks and libraries, making it relatively trivial to perform tasks that would be very complex or time-consuming to implement on deeply embedded mcu-based systems.

One of the areas where this is particularly true is with graphics and user interfaces. The HW requirements are fairly high to be able to work with large displays (larger than say 320×240 pixels), and even if you can meet the timing requirements — a 7″ 800×480 display probably requires ~40MHz for the pixel clock — there are very few open source or inexpensive graphics frameworks out there to render the kinds of modern UIs people expect today.

The Pi is really stands out here since it’s trivial to render complex UIs, taking advantage of modern features like Unicode text and complex scripts, and being able to use different fonts without having to worry about memory and rendering time (it can take a couple hundred KB of SRAM to render a TTF on an embedded system, and the libraries to interpret them are both large and complex), etc. You can also easily display the graphics on any inexpensive composite television or HDMI monitor, which is amazing for a $35 board … more than the cost of many LCDs!

This tutorial will show you one way to get started drawing graphics on an external display using pygame along with Adafruit’s WebIDE, and almost any external display (several are available here).

Check out the tutorial here!


Featured Adafruit Products

947_MED

NTSC/PAL (Television) TFT Display – 7″ Diagonal – Yes, this is an adorable small television! The visible display measures only 7″ (17.8cm) diagonal, the TFT comes with a NTSC/PAL driver board, enclosure and stand. The display is very easy to use – simply connect the included 12VDC adapter to the 2.1mm center-positive DC jack, then connect a composite video source to one of the RCA cable. (read more)

Related

“D is for Diode” – Circuit Playground Episode 4 is out now! CLICK HERE TO WATCH!

Have an amazing project to share? Join the SHOW-AND-TELL every Wednesday night at 7:30pm ET on Google+ Hangouts.

Join us every Wednesday night at 8pm ET for Ask an Engineer!

Learn resistor values with Mho’s Resistance or get the best electronics calculator for engineers “Circuit Playground”Adafruit’s Apps!



No Comments

No comments yet.

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.