February 18, 2013 AT 10:59 am

Adafruit’s @Raspberry_Pi Lesson 13. Power Control – Control 110V devices from your Raspberry Pi

Learn-Raspberry-Pi-5

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Overview-13

Adafruit’s Raspberry Pi Lesson 13. Power Control @ The Adafruit Learning System. Control 110V devices from your Raspberry Pi.

The Raspberry Pi can make a great home automation controller. But to be really useful, it needs to be able to turn electrical appliances and lights on and off. That means it needs to be able to control 110V safely. In this lesson, you will combine the PIR sensor from [Lesson 12] with the Powerswitch Tail 2 module from Adafruit, to automatically switch something on when movement is detected.

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Overview-12

Adafruit’s Raspberry Pi Lesson 12. Sensing Movement @ The Adafruit Learning System. Sense movement and doors opening with your Raspberry Pi.

In this lesson, you will learn how to use the digital inputs on the GPIO connector with a door sensor and a PIR motion detector. In this lesson, we will concentrate on sensing movement and activation of the door switch. In Lesson 13 we will build on this security sensing to have the Pi use a digital output to control the power to an electrical appliance when movement is detected.

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Summary

Adafruit’s Raspberry Pi Lesson 11. DS18B20 Temperature Sensing @ The Adafruit Learning System.

The Occidentalis Linux distribution for Raspberry Pi (and Raspbian as of Dec 2012) includes support for the DS18B20 1-wire temperature sensor. These sensors come in a small three pin package like a transistor and are accurate digital devices.

In this lesson, you will learn how to use a DS18B20 with the Raspberry Pi to take temperature readings.

Since the Raspberry Pi has no ADC (Analog to Digital Converter), it cannot directly use an analog temperature sensor like the TMP36, making the DS18B20 a good choice for temperature sensing.

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Photo Uln

OAdafruit’s Raspberry Pi Lesson 10. Stepper Motors @ The Adafruit Learning System. Control a stepper motor with a L293D or ULN2803 -

Stepper motors fall somewhere in between a regular DC motor (Lesson 9) and a servo motor (Lesson 8]). They have the advantage that they can be positioned accurately, moved forward or backwards one ‘step’ at a time, but they can also rotate continuously.

In this lesson you will learn how to control a stepper motor using your Raspberry Pi and the same L293D motor control chip that you used with the DC motor in Lesson 9.

The Lesson will also show you how to use an alternative driver chip, the ULN2803.

For this project, it does not really matter if you use a L293D or a ULN2803. The lower cost of the ULN2803 and the four spare outputs, that you could use for something else, probably make it the best choice if you don’t have either chip.

The motor is quite low power and suffers less from the surges in current than DC motors and servos (which use DC motors). This project will therefore work okay powered from the 5V line of the Raspberry Pi, as long as the Pi is powered from a good supply of at least 1A.

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Overview-10

Adafruit’s Raspberry Pi Lesson 9. Controlling a DC Motor @ The Adafruit Learning System. Drive a DC motor forward and in reverse with variable speed -

This lesson describes how to control both the speed and direction of a DC motor using Python and a L293D chip.  In Lesson 8, we used the Pi to generate pulses to control the position of a servo motor. In this lesson we use pulses to control the speed of a regular DC motor and the L293D motor control chip to reverse the direction of the current through the motor and hence the direction in which it turns.

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Overview-9

Adafruit’s Raspberry Pi Lesson 8. Using a Servo Motor @ The Adafruit Learning System.

This lesson describes how to control a single servo motor using Python. Servo motors are controlled by pulses of varying lengths. This requires fairly accurate timing. The Raspberry Pi has one pin that generates pulses in hardware, without having to rely on the operating system. Occidentalis includes an interface to make use of this pin for controlling a servo motor.

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Adafruit’s Raspberry Pi Lesson 7. Remote Control with VNC @ The Adafruit Learning System.

In this lesson we will explain how to install and use VNC on your raspberry Pi. This will allow you to see your Raspberry Pi’s desktop remotely in a graphical way, using the mouse as if you were sitting in front of your Pi.

Connecting to a Pi like this can save on desktop clutter, and the problem of having multiple keyboards and mice all over the place. It also means you can put your Pi somewhere else on the network, but still control it.

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Putty Connected

Tutorial: Adafruit’s Raspberry Pi Lesson 6. Using SSH @ The Adafruit Learning System.

In this lesson you will learn how to remote control your Raspberry Pi over your local network using Secure Shell (SSH). A common reason for remote controlling your Pi from another computer us that you may be using your Pi solely to control some electronics and therefore not need a keyboard, mouse and monitor, other than for setting it up. It also can just save on desktop clutter, and the problem of having multiple keyboards and mice all over the place.

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Overview-7

Adafruit’s Raspberry Pi Lesson 5. Using a Console Cable @ The Adafruit Learning System.

In this lesson you will learn how to remote control your Raspberry Pi with a console cable. The great advantage of connecting this way is that it can even supply the power for your Pi and you do not need keyboard, mouse or display attached to the Pi to log into it.

You will need to install terminal emulation software (ZOC) and also USB drivers for the Console Lead. ZOC is available for Mac and Windows and allows you to communicate through a serial port from your Mac or PC to another computer – in this case the Raspberry Pi.

The Raspberry Pi uses its built-in serial port to allow devices to connect to its console and issue commands just as if you were logged in.

In the next lesson, we will look at another way of doing much the same thing but over a local network using something called SSH.

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Gpio

Adafruit’s Raspberry Pi Lesson 4. GPIO Setup @ The Adafruit Learning System. Learn how to setup your Pi for Hacking Electronics!

One of the great things about the Raspberry Pi is that it has a GPIO connector to which you can attach external hardware.

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Network Leds

Tutorial: Adafruit’s Raspberry Pi Lesson 3. Network Setup @ The Adafruit Learning System.

One of the first things that you will want to do is to get your Raspberry Pi connected up to the Internet.

In this lesson, you will learn how to:

  • Connect using an Ethernet cable
  • Use a WiFi adapter with both Raspbian and Occidentalis
  • Find out the IP address of your Raspberry Pi

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Adafruit’s Raspberry Pi Lesson 2. First Time Configuration @ THe Adafruit Learning System. Set up your Raspberry Pi for the first time!

In the first lesson of this series, we showed you how to prepare an SD card containing an operating system for your Raspberry Pi. In this lesson, we will show you how to setup your Raspberry Pi the first time you boot it up.

We do this using a tool called Raspi-Config that runs automatically the first time you boot your Raspberry Pi. This starts before the windowing system and so you have to use the cursor keys and Return key to navigate the menu system.

It is a bit like adjusting the BIOS settings on a PC, once you have things right, you probably won’t need it again.

We will start with the options that are most important and then look at some of the other options that you may wish to configure.

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Overview

Adafruit’s Raspberry Pi Lesson 1. Preparing and SD Card for your Raspberry Pi @ The Adafruit Learning System. A new series of of tutorials here at Adafruit by the prolific Simon Monk!

When you buy a Raspberry Pi, it may or may not be sold with an SD card. The SD card is important because this is where the Raspberry Pi keeps its operating system and is also where you will store your documents and programs.  

Even if your Pi came with an SD card with the operating system on, it is a good idea to update it to the latest version, as improvements and bug fixes are going in all the time. Since putting the operating system onto an SD card wipes everything else off the card, it is worth considering using a USB flash drive for your documents, so that when you install a new version of the operating system, you dont’ have the complication of copying them off somewhere self before reformatting the SD card.

If your Pi did not come with an SD card then the minimum size you should get is 4GB, but buy a bigger SD card if you think you will need the space.
This lesson shows you how to create an SD card for your Raspberry Pi.

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