February 28, 2012 AT 12:51 pm

BB313: A Breadboarding Platform for the ATTiny2313/4313

 

A little over a year ago, I started playing around with the newly available AVR ATTiny4313. It’s a neat little chip, and you can have a lot of fun with it. However, I soon got tired of wiring up programming headers, power supplies and all the other stuff you need to get up and running. I also grew wary of all this support circuitry taking up significant breadboard real estate.

To eliminate all that hassle, I created the BB313. It’s got all the stuff you need (programming header, regulated 5V power, etc.) wrapped up in a nice little package, and it plugs in on the edge of the breadboard so you have lots of space for other stuff. I also added an 6-pin connector for an FTDI cable or adapter.

I originally designed it for myself, but I figured other people might like it too, so I’m releasing it open-source CC-BY-SA 3.0) so you can make your own.

All the details and source files are at the project page. If you find it useful, please let me know!

this post is a duplicate of a post at my blog.

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5 Comments

  1. I think someone managed to get a bootloader on the 4313, but it ended up using over 50% of the progmem. This really isn’t designed as an Arduino replacement in any sense of the word. It’s meant for people who want to run tiny programs on a tiny chip.

    While it is possible to disable external reset, it’s not really designed for that either. You can only take a chip in and out of a DIP socket so many times before you have a mechanical failure.

  2. Awesome write up – I love it that you included a BOM with real part number in there. It makes it so much easier – and it’s always fun to see what parts people are using.

  3. Nice John! Like a typical level of Johngineer project awesomeness.

  4. Very nice design. I like the single-row plug-board breakout. But a couple-few suggestions:

    1. Add a way to jumper-out (cut-trace?) the LEDs for low-power operation.

    2. The 7805 regulator is ancient, how about a modern yet easy to find LDO option?.

    3. Nice to see you posted .png files of the board and schematic (so few Eagle users just dump the native Eagle files). And the BOM is much appreciated. But I don’t see any Gerber and drill info for those of us who know better than to use Eagle. It would also be helpful to know who did your boards, just in-case we wanted to send Gerbers.

  5. @George and Jeremy: thanks guys — I’m glad you like it!

    @Drone:
    “1. Add a way to jumper-out (cut-trace?) the LEDs for low-power operation.”

    If you don’t want the LEDs, don’t use them. If you install them and then decide you don’t want them, disconnect the appropriate resistors.

    “2. The 7805 regulator is ancient, how about a modern yet easy to find LDO option?.”

    It’s also dirt cheap. There’s no reason why you can’t swap in an LDO, or simply connect a battery to the output and GND terminals of the 7805 pads.

    “3. Nice to see you posted .png files of the board and schematic (so few Eagle users just dump the native Eagle files). And the BOM is much appreciated. But I don’t see any Gerber and drill info for those of us who know better than to use Eagle. It would also be helpful to know who did your boards, just in-case we wanted to send Gerbers.”

    Gerber files are rarely distributed with OSHW. Mostly because those of us who use Eagle just “don’t know any better.”

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