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March 24, 2010 AT 11:00 pm

Breaking rules – 24 hours of Lady Ada Lovelace day #ald10

Pt 2735
Each hour today we’ve featured a woman we admire who is currently doing amazing work right in the tech/maker/art/science space. There is more women we could write about than hours in the day and now we’re out of time. It was a lot fun and very easy to write these up all day and night – we know we could not include everyone and we hope others around the web posted about them. Post in the comments if you’d like too, that’s what today is all about. Since this is the last post of the day we’re going to break some rules, many/most of the women today have inspired us to break the rules in some way so it seems ok :) Over the last 24 hours we’ve focused on mostly tech/makers/art but we also wanted to celebrate some of our favorite authors that keep up entertained, enlightened and inspired.

Pt 2745

Violet Blue. Violet was a crew member of industrial machine performance art group Survival Research Labs from 1996 to May 2007. She is a top 25 Forbes “Web Celeb” and one of Wired’s “Faces of Innovation.” Blue is regarded as the foremost sexuality and technology futurist and sex-positive pundit in mainstream media (such as The Oprah Winfrey Show, CNN, Attack of The Show and The Tyra Banks Show).

Margery Conner. Margery Conner joined Reed’s electronics-industry portal, e-inSITE, as a technical editor in 1998 and became editorial director in 1999. She created some of the earliest e-mail newsletters for the electronics industry, including narrowly focused niche newsletters. She also developed a video-on-demand news program for the electronics-OEM market. When EDN magazine absorbed e-inSITE, she moved over to EDN as Technical Editor, Online Initiatives. In addition, she covers the Power Systems beat. She has a BSEE from the University of California—Irvine and 10 years of experience as a design engineer and engineering manager.

Xeni Jardin. Xeni is a tech culture journalist. She is a partner, contributor, and co-editor of the award winning blog Boing Boing. She is executive producer and host of the Webby-honored program Boing Boing Video (formerly Boing Boing TV). » She contributes to broadcast, online, and print venues including Wired and NPR, is a frequently-sought “tech expert” in broadcast news. She rides unicorns and drives cupcakes, likes to rock out, and occasionally floats in spaceships.

Annalee Newitz. Annalee covers the cultural impact of science and technology, such as topics on open source software and hacker subcultures. She writes for many periodicals from Popular Science to Wired, and since 1999 has had a syndicated weekly column called Techsploitation. From 2004-2005 she was a policy analyst for the Electronic Frontier Foundation. She is the editor of io9, a Gawker-owned science fiction blog. In 2006 she published a book based on her doctoral research. It’s called Pretend We’re Dead, and it was published by Duke University Press. In early 2007, Seal Press published a collection of essays she co-edited called She’s Such a Geek — it’s about female nerds.

Gina Trapani. Gina is an award-winning author, blogger, and programmer whose work translates cutting-edge technology into insights that boost personal productivity. Gina was the founding editor of Lifehacker.com, the seminal blog which garnered nominations for Blog of the Decade and yielded the best-selling book, Upgrade Your Life, a compendium of the best lessons from the thousands-strong Lifehacker community. Currently Gina is a project director at Expert Labs leading development on ThinkTank, an open source crowdsourcing platform the White House will use.


About today:

Ada Lovelace Day is an international day of blogging (videologging, podcasting, comic drawing etc.!) to draw attention to the achievements of women in technology and science. Women’s contributions often go unacknowledged, their innovations seldom mentioned, their faces rarely recognized. We want you to tell the world about these unsung heroines, whatever they do. It doesn’t matter how new or old your blog is, what gender you are, what language you blog in, or what you normally blog about – everyone is invited.

Who was Ada? Ada Lovelace Augusta Ada King, Countess of Lovelace (10 December 1815 – 27 November 1852) was one of the world’s first computer programmers, and one of the first people to see computers as more than just a machine for doing sums. She wrote programs for Charles Babbage’s Analytical Engine, a general-purpose computing machine, despite the fact that it was never built. She also wrote the very first description of a computer and of software.


And that’s it folks, we need to go back to work and ship a lot of kits! Thank you for reading today!


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5 Comments

  1. I vote lady Ada for having a big brain and making electronics fun!

    ~ Beth Gibbons for giving me Portishead and Hope Sandoval for Mazzy Star and I guess I should add my mom for explaining to me that a bass was an instrument and not just a fish… RIP!!

  2. I vote for Kickfroggy, my girlfriend, who is an aspiring hardware hacker, full time student taking TWO degrees at the same time, one in Electrical Engineering, and one in Computer Network Security, and who spoils me rotten with amazing awesome and healthy food.

    She is the best, and I am WAAY proud of her.

    I’ve been taking her to cons, and she is great at them. But damn, you should see how the guys assume she is arm candy, and when she makes a cogent comment, the light dawns in their eyes. “Oh, you do have a brain! And it’s a good one!” It’s kinda funny.

    Anyway, I love her dearly, and I would like to nominate her as a serious Woman in Tech.

    (She’ll probably kill me for writing this. Good bye, sweet world. It was worth it. ;)

    Quadling

  3. I really enjoyed this feature.
    Two more names for next year that I expected to see were:
    Commodore Grace Hooper, author of the first compiler. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grace_Hopper
    Heady Lemar, a great example of “don’t discount the mind just because it’s behind a pretty face”, the inventor of frequency hopping. http://www.hypatiamaze.org/h_lamarr/scigrrl.html

  4. good ones – not alive, we stuck to ones that were doing stuff at the moment. maybe next year we’ll have past and present.

  5. Thank you for doing this awesome feature – I wanted to read them all so it took me this long to reply and thank you. Loved it!

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